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2011 Press Coverage

Fall 2011

New York Times, November 27, 2011
Don't Know? Well, Find Someone Who Does
Now a sophomore at WVU, Katherine Bomkamp, 20, created the Pain Free Socket, a therapeutic prosthetic device to relieve pain and discomfort for amputees with the assistance of ECE Professor Gilmer Blankenship, ECE Staff Engineer Jay Renner, and students in the BAE Systems Controls Instructional Laboratory.

CBS Baltimore, October 1, 2011
University of Maryland Wins U.S. Solar Decathlon
The University of Maryland has won top overall honors in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon.

The Washington Post, October 1, 2011
U-Md.'Watershed' home wins Solar Decathlon
A green home designed and built by University of Maryland students took top overall honors in this year’s U.S. Energy Department Solar Decathlon, which aims to showcase innovative and affordable solar-powered homes.

Los Angeles Times, October 1, 2011
University of Maryland wins 2011 Solar Decathlon for house design
The University of Maryland won the 2011 Solar Decathlon on Saturday afternoon, beating students from Purdue, a New Zealand team and a combined entry from Caltech and the Southern California Institute of Architecture in the U.S. Department of Energy's biannual design competition.

The Baltimore Sun, October 1, 2011
University of Maryland wins Solar Decathlon for house design
The University of Maryland took first place Saturday in the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon 2011 with a solar-powered, energy-conserving WaterShed House that was inspired by the Chesapeake Bay.

Washington Post, September 15, 2011
Robots take over University of Maryland's Classrooms
At the University of Maryland, robots rule, if only for a day. Engineering students coax their creations to life, using batteries and, in one case, mind control. (The Associated Press)

The Baltimore Business Journal, September 14, 2011
Edward St. John gifts $10M to kick-start University of Maryland classroom building
Baltimore developer and philanthropist Edward St. John has made a $10 million gift to a proposed teaching and learning center at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Summer 2011

Chemical & Engineering News, August 1, 2011
Making Films One Layer at a Time
At the University of Maryland, Ekaterina Pomerantseva, a research associate working with Reza Ghodssi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, exploits ALD's knack for coating nanowires to make novel biotemplated electrodes for microsized lithium-ion batteries.

The Washington Post, July 29, 2011
UMd Researcher Develops Wireless Bridge Warning System
A University of Maryland researcher says he has developed a wireless bridge monitoring system to test for problems like those that brought down a Minneapolis bridge four years ago.

The Baltimore Sun, July 21, 2011
College Park Students Compete to Build Green House
At a small construction site tucked between an ice skating rink and an office building, students, professors and contractors sing along to country music as they put the finishing touches on two small houses joined in the middle by a manmade wetland. The University of Maryland students are building WaterShed, the school's entry in the 2011 Solar Decathlon. They are competing against 19 other teams from around the world, including China and Australia.

The Washington Post, July 17, 2011
Old Dominion U Professor Is Trying to Save Internet History
Michael Nelson, a computer science professor at Old Dominion University in Virginia has spent the past couple of years studying how much of the Internet is being saved — what portion of the vast sea of online ephemera is preserved in some permanent archive. Joseph JaJa, a professor at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland and a fellow time traveler, is working on another tool that would allow a search of the archived Internet as it existed at a time of one’s choosing.

Sacramento Bee, June 3, 2011
Maryland Researchers Skeptical of Cell Phone Radiation Studies
University of Maryland researchers in the A. James Clark School of Engineering have expressed concerns regarding the validity of recent findings announced in the Journal of the American Medical Association and a World Health Organization panel suggesting that radiation from cell phones may be carcinogenic. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Christopher Davis and Senior Research Scientist Quirino Balzano co-wrote a letter to the editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on this subject that was published in the most recent issue of the journal. Davis and Balzano, who each have more than 35 years of research experience in the biological effects of wireless telecommunications technology, pointed out that the highest temperature elevations that occur in the brain during cell phone use as a result of radiofrequency fields from the cell phone are on the order of 0.1 degrees C to 0.2 degrees C, and that these temperature elevations are smaller than those resulting from physical activity.

Channel Partners, June 3, 2011
Researchers Challenge Findings from AMA's Cell Phone Cancer Study
University of Maryland researchers are challenging the validity of findings recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggesting that radiation from cell phones can produce biological changes in the brain. The researchers in the A. James Clark School of Engineering also have raised concerns over a World Health Organization pronouncement that classifies radiation from cell phones as a possible carcinogen.
 

Spring 2011


IEEE Spectrum, May 30, 2011
JAMA Cellphone Study May Be Flawed
Christopher Davis and Quirino Balzaro, both researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park's department of electrical and computer engineering... believe this study is flawed, as there is no mechanism other than heating by which the radiofrequency fields from a cell phone could affect human tissue

The Diamondback, May 30, 2011
New vice president for research to come from within university community
Patrick O'Shea — who has served as chair of the department of electrical and computer engineering for the past six years and is the co-director of the Maryland Cybersecurity Center — will take the helm as the university's new vice president for research July 1. Behavioral and Social Sciences Dean John Townshend, who chaired the 17-person search committee, said the group was looking for leaders who were interested in promoting research across multiple disciplines: from the sciences and the social sciences to the arts and the humanities. And O'Shea fit the bill very well, he said. "He is a person of immense breadth," Townshend said. "He understands the campus, and he understands the different parts of the campus. And he's actively bringing people across the campus together to look at challenging new innovations. That's exactly what we need —someone of those kind of capabilities."

CityBiz News, Baltimore, May 27, 2011
New UMD VP for Research Stresses Closer Ties with USM Institutions, Industry, Government
The University of Maryland's new vice president for research, Patrick O'Shea proposes an aggressive plan to build the school's regional, national and global research profile, with an emphasis on multidisciplinary, large-scale collaborations with industry and government, as well as closer ties with the University of Maryland School of Medicine and other University System institutions.

CBS Baltimore, May 23, 2011
New Study: Md. Potential Center For Cyber Security
A new study released by the University of Maryland puts our state in the middle of that cyber battlefield. “It’s both a challenge, but an opportunity for the university and our state,” said Dr. William Kirwan, Chancellor of the University of Maryland. According to the most recent numbers, 2,000 Maryland students graduated with degrees in cyber security. “The educational institutions have to produce the workforce, the talent, to be successful in winning this war,” said Kirwan.

New Electronics, May 10, 2011
Practical applications for metamaterials beyond the invisibility cloak
The most offbeat use so far is as a demonstration of the impossibility of time travel. Using a metamaterial intended to model some of the conditions present shortly after the Big Bang, Igor Smolyaninov and Yu-Ju Hung of the University of Maryland claimed in April 2011 to have shown that time travel can never be possible.

IEEE Spectrum Blog, May 4, 2011
Nuclear Regulator: Stopping Cybersecurity Threat Needs IT Experts and Systems Engineers
James Wiggins, director of the Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response at the NRC, spoke today on future nuclear power plant security, emphasizing the need for it to be based in both operational and information technology expertise. While the role for IT professionals in power plants is crucial, he said, it must work in tandem with systems engineering expertise. Understanding the physical consequences of cybersecurity threats is key to mitigating cyber risks, he said. The talk is part of a conference on Commercial Nuclear Power Cybersecurity, which got underway today with talks by representatives from a range of government security organizations, who each reviewed cybersecurity risks to nuclear power and the regulatory policies in development to deal with them. The University of Maryland conference brings together regulators, industry engineers, and academics to discuss collaborative approaches to deal with the unprecedented nature of cyber threats to an industry that’s already undergoing scrutiny from multiple angles.

IEEE Spectrum, April 2011
Cognitive Radio and Game Theory
(A feature article by Prof. K. J. Ray Liu)
The kind of communication I'm talking about here falls under the umbrella of cognitive radio. That term refers to intelligent systems of wireless communication in which the radios people carry around try to achieve the best performance possible by sensing and adapting to changes in their electromagnetic environments, including changes in the way other radios are operating. Regulatory bodies such as the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are just beginning to embrace the idea of cognitive radio, recognizing that the traditional way they have assigned fixed portions of the spectrum is hopelessly inefficient. It's inefficient because whoever holds the license to broadcast at some assigned frequency doesn't actually use that privilege everywhere or at all times. Yet nobody else is free to use that frequency even when it's wide open. The upshot is that radio spectrum, one of the world's most valuable resources, is mostly wasted.

Chemistry World, April 7, 2011
Power sources get flexible
US scientists have designed an ultra-thin, flexible battery with the highest charge capacity reported for thin film cells. The battery can also be charged at a lower voltage than lithium ion batteries. Flexible batteries offer advantages over more rigid systems as they can be incorporated into many modern devices, from powering up limb prostheses to detection systems for cracks and strains in concrete structures, for example. But electrochemical energy sources for the batteries are plagued by toxicity, the risk of explosive flammability and physical bulkiness. Daniel Lowy from FlexEl, a company in Maryland that develops rechargeable batteries made from thin films, and Prof. Martin Peckerar from the University of Maryland, and colleagues, have developed a thin galvanic cell that is safe to use and non-toxic because it doesn't corrode in electrolyte media.

Southern Maryland Online, April 7, 2011
UMD's Solar Decathlon Home to Compete in International Competition
Imagine a house surrounded by man-made wetlands. On one wall, native fruits grow off vines. Inside is a waterfall to promote humidity control, and water runs under the house's middle to filter storm runoff. That's the vision of a University of Maryland team building a solar-powered house for an international competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Maryland team held a "shed raising" ceremony Thursday to highlight the university's entry into the biennial Solar Decathlon. DOE challenged Maryland and colleges and universities around the world to build solar homes that are livable and affordable.

The Diamondback, May 30, 2011
Peddling it forward
In the grueling summer heat, two students hope to connect their activist spirit with their inner cyclist, biking from Virginia Beach, Va., to Portland, Ore., to help build homes and educate communities about affordable housing. Through the Bike & Build organization, Natan Simhai and Noam Fine will be part of a 34-member group traveling 3,800 miles to offer daily presentations about affordable housing and work weekly on active construction sites with Habitat for Humanity and other organizations. "The trip basically combines everything that I love: being outdoors, traveling to a certain degree and participating in service," said Fine, a senior electrical engineering major. "I'm excited to see the country from the saddle of a bike rather then from the seat of car ... but really what I'm most excited for is the grassroots organizing."

Associated Press, March 22, 2011
University of Maryland To Hold Cybersecurity Seminar Series
The University of Maryland will hold a cybersecurity seminar next month made possible by a sponsorship from Google. The university announced Tuesday that the series will begin with a talk by Vint Cerf, one of the Internet's founding fathers, entitled "Can We Make the Internet Safer?" The seminar, scheduled to begin April 7 in College Park, is being organized by the Maryland Cybersecurity Center. Other speakers at the seminar will talk about the impact that cybersecurity threats and protective measures are having on privacy, social networks, business and national security. A second seminar will be held April 21. The university says Google has committed to a three-year sponsorship of the new series. It will include three seminars a semester.

CBS Baltimore, March 22, 2011
U. Of Md. To Hold Cybersecurity Seminar Series
The University of Maryland will hold a cybersecurity seminar in April made possible by a sponsorship from Google. The university announced Tuesday that the series will begin with a talk by Vint Cerf, one of the Internet’s founding fathers, entitled “Can We Make the Internet Safer?” The seminar, scheduled to begin April 7 in College Park, is being organized by the Maryland Cybersecurity Center. Other speakers at the seminar will talk about the impact that cybersecurity threats and protective measures are having on privacy, social networks, business and national security. A second seminar will be held April 21. The university says Google has committed to a three-year sponsorship of the new series. It will include three seminars a semester.

Washington Business Journal, March 22, 2011
Google sponsors University of Maryland cybersecurity talks
Google Inc. will sponsor a new cybersecurity seminar series at the University of Maryland next month. The series, organized by the school’s Maryland Cyber Security Center, will include three separate seminars, starting April 7 with speaker Vint Cerf, one of the fathers of the Internet who co-developed the architecture of the Internet. His speech, at 7 p.m. at the College Park Campus, is titled "Can We Make The Internet Safer?"

Federal News Radio, March 17, 2011
March Madness begins for cyber defense contest
It's that time of year again when you have to fill out your March Madness brackets. But not for the basketball tournament -- for the cyber defense contest. The San Antonio Business Journal reports the city will host the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. The tournament pits teams of college-age computer whizzes against some of the best hackers in the world. The eight teams will compete over a three-day period for the title of Cyber Defense champion and the coveted Alamo Cup. Both the University of Maryland and the Air Force Academy have made the cut. The contest kicks off April 7.

Mid-Atlantic Cyber Defense Competition, March 14, 2011
University of Maryland Wins 6th CyberWatch Mid-Atlantic CCDC, Heads to San Antonio!
The 6th annual CyberWatch Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (MA CCDC) came to a successful conclusion Saturday evening, March 12 with the University of Maryland College Park team winning top honors and a chance to compete in the National CCDC in San Antonio, TX, April 8-10, 2011.

Business Journal, March 8, 2011
Mtech Announces Semifinalists for University of Maryland $75K Business Plan Competition
The Maryland Technology Enterprise Institute (Mtech) today announces 20 high-technology and biotechnology semifinalists for the University of Maryland $75K Business Plan Competition. Now in its eleventh year, the competition has served as a launch pad for Inc. 500 companies. Semi-finalists were selected among 71 entries in the categories of high-technology and biotechnology and undergraduate students. Entries, submitted as executive summaries, were advanced based upon their value proposition, competitive advantage, target market, business model, intellectual property, and clarity. Finalists will be announced April 5. On May 6, as part of the University of Maryland $75K Business Plan Competition finals, they will present their companies to a panel of judges from the regional venture-building community before a live audience at the Stamp Student Union.

Gazette, February 24, 2011
Collaboration the key for state grant
Frederick company, Cerona Networks, which provides satellite network services, received a $268,600 MIPS grant to develop a broadband satellite system that can be used for terrestrial Internet connections and can be retrofitted to existing systems. Cerona will partner with John Baras, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering and the Institute for Systems Research at the University of Maryland, College Park. Neither Cerona officials nor Baras returned phone calls seeking comment.

Nuclearstreet.com, February 23, 2011
UM, NRC and Nuclear Industry Leaders Team Up
Nuclear security and IT managers take note: The University of Maryland has announced experts from academia, industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will lead a workshop on nuclear plant cybersecurity this spring.

CTV News, February 17, 2011
Cyber Pickpocketing
Cyber thieves skimming your wallet? They can do it without ever leaving a fingerprint. CTV's Markette Smith interviews ECE Professor John Baras.

Tmcnet.com, February 15, 2011
Dr. Rajiv Laroia Joins Executive Ranks
Wireless and telecommunications industry veteran (and ECE alumnus) Dr. Rajiv Laroia comes aboard Sonus Network as SVP and CTO. He previously served as Senior Vice President of Qualcomm Flarion Technologies.

Gazette.net, February 11, 2011
Government clearance a roadblock for tech graduates
Although most students graduating with bachelor's degrees in the science, technology, engineering and math fields involved in cybersecurity are U.S. citizens who are easily eligible for clearance, the percentage of foreign students increases with each degree level, said Patrick O'Shea, co-director of the University of Maryland's cybersecurity center in College Park. Foreign students here on visas make up one-third of master's graduates in these fields and more than half of the Ph.D. graduates, he said.

Diamondback Online, February 8, 2011
Turn the Party On
Tam Nguyen's dorm room looks rather ordinary. There's a typical bed-dresser-desk setup and colorful posters on the walls — nothing that would draw too much attention. But that quickly changes when Nguyen presses an orange button on his computer screen labeled "party." "Just hit the button [and] all the lights turn off, the strobe lights come out and the music starts playing," said Nguyen, a junior computer engineering major.

Gazette, February 8, 2011
Tenable tapped by UM to spur cybersecurity program
A growing Columbia network security company is partnering with the University of Maryland, College Park to help foster Maryland's burgeoning cybersecurity work force, among other goals.

WUSA9.com, February 8, 2011
University Makes Partnership On Cybersecurity
The University of Maryland has announced a partnership with Tenable Network Security to promote cybersecurity education and research.

Techworld.com, January 31, 2011
Multi-core processing demands change to computing infrastructure
To use multicore processors effectively the IT industry needs to radically rethink the basic computer architecture it has used over the past 50 years, a University of Maryland researcher argues in the January edition of the Association for Computing Machinery's flagship Communications publication. "The recent dramatic shift from single-processor computer systems to many-processor parallel ones requires reinventing much of computer science to build and program the new systems," argues Uzi Vishkin, a professor of computer engineering at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, in the paper.

Diamondback Online, January 30, 2011
Bettering Batteries
For two years, researchers from the engineering school and the agriculture and natural resources college have been developing smaller, more efficient and cost-effective batteries that could have a 10-fold increase in energy capacity over a commercial battery. "If we can show that these batteries are as powerful or more powerful than standard AA batteries and are smaller in weight and size, then ultimately you have a technology that produces more cost-effective power and longer-lasting batteries for future applications," electrical engineering professor Reza Ghodssi said.

PCWorld.com, January 29, 2011
'Radical Redesign' Urged for Future Computers
To use multicore processors effectively the IT industry needs to radically rethink the basic computer architecture it has used over the past 50 years, a University of Maryland researcher argues in the January edition of the Association for Computing Machinery's flagship Communications publication. "The recent dramatic shift from single-processor computer systems to many-processor parallel ones requires reinventing much of computer science to build and program the new systems," argues Uzi Vishkin, a professor of computer engineering at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, in the paper.

Akron.com, January 27, 2011
Judith Resnik leaves lasting legacy
Family of Electrical and Computer Engineering alumna Judith Resnik remember her life before and after the tragic Challenger Space Shuttle explosion that happened 25 years ago.

Computerworld, January 26, 2011
CS pioneer Knuth releases long-awaited textbook
"Knuth's 'Art of Computing Programming' played a definite formative role in transforming the field of computing from its infancy stage into a respected discipline," noted Uzi Vishkin, a professor at the University of Maryland's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies.

Henrietta WHEC.com, January 19, 2011
Entrepreneur Brian Hinman to offer keynote address at 2011 RIT Commencement
Electrical and Computer Engineering alumnus and entrepreneur Brian Hinman will be the RIT keynote speaker for commencement on May 20, 2011.

New York Times, January 18, 2011
After Scrutiny by New Jersey, College Names a New Leader
Nariman Farvardin, provost and former Dean of the Clark School of Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering Chair, was appointed president of Stevens Institue of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Washington Post, January 18, 2011
U-Md. provost named president of Stevens Institute
Provost Nariman Farvardin of the University of Maryland, College Park was named President of Stevens Institute of Technology.

Wall Street Journal, January 18, 2011
University Seeks A New Direction
Provost Nariman Farvardin was elected as president of Stevens Institute of Technology with high hopes to connect students, faculty and alumni and excel academically after hardships from the former president's scandal.